Options on Ten Select Sector Indices To Launch

On September 12 CBOE Holdings, Inc. announced plans to expand its suite of product offerings tied to S&P Dow Jones Indices with the planned launch of options on the 10 S&P Select Sector Indices that comprise the S&P 500 Index, a key benchmark of the U.S. equities market.

  • Options will be available on 10 sectors that comprise the S&P 500, pending regulatory approval.
  • The new options are expected to hold particular market appeal for European investors interested in targeted exposure within key U.S. equity benchmarks.
  • Further expands CBOE’s successful suite of products tied to S&P Dow Jones Indices, with trading and settlement features similar to CBOE’s S&P 500 options (SPX).

CHART 1 – WEIGHTINGS FOR S&P SELECT SECTOR INDEXES

 

CBOE Holdings President and Chief Operating Officer Chris Concannon delivered remarks on sectors to attendees of the 6th annual CBOE Risk Management Conference (RMC) Europe, currently taking place near London. “We are excited that we will be able to provide exposure to these key U.S. sector indices for European customers who have been keen to incorporate U.S. sector investing strategies into their portfolios, but have not had access to an efficient trading vehicle to realize this strategy,” Mr. Concannon said.

CHART 2 – TICKERS, NOTIONAL VALUE, HISTORIC VOLATILITY

The table provides index ticker symbol, options trading symbol, approximate notional value covered by index options with a $100 multiplier on September 1, 2017 (if they were available on that date), and the average 30-trading day historic volatility over 5 years for each of the 10 indexes. In addition, Chart 5 below shows how historic volatility had changed since 1998 for the Tech and Energy sectors.

CHART 3 – PRICES SINCE MID-1998 FOR FIVE SELECT SECTOR INDEXES

 Nine of the ten S&P Select Sector indices have a price of 250 on June 30, 1998, while the S&P Real Estate Select Sector Index (IXRE, SIXRE) has a shorter price history and has a price of 100 on December 30, 2011. To facilitate easier comparison of the nine indexes with price history back to 1998, I created Chart 3 and Chart 4 below. In Chart 3, the (Consumer Discretionary) IXY Index rose 261% while the (Financial) IXM Index rose only 21%.

 

 CHART 4 – PRICES SINCE MID-1998 FOR FIVE SELECT SECTOR INDEXES

In Chart 4 the IXV (Health Care) Index rose 226%, while the IXU (Utilities) Index rose 121%.

CHART 5 – HISTORIC VOLATILITY FOR ENERGY AND TECH SECTORS SINCE 1998

The table in Chart 2 above presents the historic volatilities for all ten S&P Select Sector indices.

Chart 5 below shows the historic volatility since 1998 for the IXE (Energy) and IXT (Technology) indices. The volatility for IXT generally was higher in 2000 to 2002, while the volatility for IXE often was higher in recent years.

CHART 6 – CORRELATIONS AMONG 12 INDICES OVER FIVE YEARS

Chart 6 below shows that the S&P Consumer Discretionary Select Sector Index (IXY, SIXY) and the S&P Industrials Select Sector Index (IXI, SIXI) both had high correlations of 0.90 versus the S&P 500 Index, while lower correlations versus the S&P 500 Index were shown for both the S&P Real Estate Select Sector Index (IXRE, SIXRE) (0.46) and for the S&P Utilities Select Sector Index (IXU, SIXU) (0.21).

EUROPEAN INVESTORS AND UCITS

CBOE Select Sector Index options are designed to potentially be problem-solvers for European asset managers who want exposure to these U.S. index sectors, but cannot hold physical delivery exchange-traded product (ETP) options in their funds because of EU regulations around UCITS (Undertakings for the Collective Investment of Transferable Securities). The options on the Select Sector Indexes are designed to provide simple, straightforward market access to these key U.S. equity sectors for European investors.

MORE INFORMATION

For more information on the planned options on S&P Select Sector Indices, including links to more than 100 price charts, and a Fact Sheet with key options specifications, please visit www.cboe.com/Sectors.

 

 

 

The posts on this blog are opinions, not advice.
Please read our disclaimer for Indices.

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